Papal Popularity

January 2, 2007

Over 3 million attended papal audiences in 2006

Vatican, Jan. 2, 2007 (CWNews.com) – More than 3 million people attended papal audiences and liturgical celebrations during 2006, according to official Vatican statistics.

In an announcement releasted on December 29, after Pope Benedict held his last Wednesday audience of the year, the Vatican said that a total of 3,222,820 people had attended the regular weekly audiences, Sunday Angelus audiences, and special ceremonies at which the Pope presided in 2006.

The official Vatican crowd estimates showed 1,295,000 attending the Angelus audiences on Sundays and holy days, while 1,031,500 attended the regular Wednesday audiences. There were also 357,120 participants in special papal audiences; and 539,200 at liturgical celebrations.

The largest crowds at weekly papal audiences came during the months of May and October, traditionally the peak periods for Vatican tourism. The largest figure for Angelus audiences came in December, when Christmas and the feast of the Immaculate Conception brought extra papal audiences.

The figures furnished by the Vatican for 2006 included the audiences held by Pope Benedict at his residence in Castel Gandolfo during his summer stay there. The figures show a sharp drop in attendance at papal functions in July, the month when the Holy Father was on vacation in the Italian Alps.

The attendance figures for 2006 are substantially higher than those for the previous years. In 2005, Pope Benedict attracted 800,000 people to the audiences he held after his election in April. Pope John Paul II (bio – news) had drawn 2.2 million people to audiences in 2004, and 2.6 million in 2003.

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10 Responses to “Papal Popularity”

  1. Anonymous said

    It is neither fair — nor accurate — to compare attendance figures from the end of one pope’s reign…to the beginning of another pope’s. — What…we rate the pope’s appearances like we rate the Today Show? — People are still getting to know Pope Benedict.

  2. Anonymous said

    It looks like you switched over to that new kind of blogger. Good for you. …. And you know how to do those labels. ….For a priest, you are kind of show-offy!

  3. rev fr lw gonzales said

    My Administrative Assistant called me a geek.

  4. Anonymous said

    I miss Katie Couric.

  5. Anonymous said

    Surely your “adman” meant it as a term of professional endearment.
    (Or not…)

  6. Anonymous said

    I miss Katie Couric too. but I think we’ve gotta give Merideth a chance.

  7. gabdandie said

    Of course I did!

  8. Sorka said

    I seem to remember back in the olden days of 1987 you were one of the few people I knew that had one of them thar dang computers, by cracky. A dandy little Tandy if I remember rightly. If it weren’t for your kindness in letting me type my Masters project on it, I don’t know how I would have managed.
    So yeah, you are a geek, but in my book thats not a bad thing at all.

  9. Mel Rose said

    Talk about job security! The ultimate in job security is being able to call your boss a geek! No, wait! The ultimate in job security might be in saying that someone who works for you called you a geek — and then having to work with that person! You, sir, may just be an instigator. Like George Clooney.

    Note: Just read that Wired magazine is featuring a story on the top places for geeks to live. The story is due out on Jan. 5. Maybe you will find that you live in a geek haven.

  10. rev fr lw gonzales said

    Yep. I remember. It was a Tandy my dad bought me at Radio Shack. It had an external 5.25″ floppy drive. DOS was of course the operating system.

    I also had a dot matrix printer that slowly cranked out pages.

    Let me go further back … my first papers at FST were written on a portable Smith Corona portable typewriter left over from my college days.

    I think that was even before Whiteout Liquid Paper.

    Before that I used a stylus on a clay tablet.

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