O Santissima

March 26, 2007

The Mass of the Solemnity of the Annunciation televised on EWTN this morning from the Cathedral of Saints Simon and Jude, Diocese of Phoenix was a fine example of what the reverently-celebrated Novus Ordo Liturgy can be.

The Introit was sung by a Schola Cantorum in Latin. The Kyrie was intoned in Greek in responsorial fashion between the schola, choir, and assembly. The readings were offered by two children from the cathedral parish school. The psalm was led in Spanish by two cantors, a man and woman. The Holy Gospel was proclaimed by one of the deacons. The Bishop’s well-crafted homily spoke of Mary’s humble response to the angel Gabriel’s message. A girl from the parish school led the Prayers of the Faithful.

Two deacons in dalmatics, and concelebrants in beautiful chasubles, assisted at the altar which was appointed with six candles and a crucifix. The paten and chalice were veiled. The hosts and wine were presented by school children. A pall covered the principal chalice as well as the assembly chalices. The altar was incensed at the preparation of the gifts. A deacon incensed the people. Heads bowed each time the Holy Name of Jesus was mentioned throughout the Mass.

The Sanctus was sung in Latin accompanied by the organ. Strings added depth to the Great Amen. The Lord’s Prayer was chanted in traditional form in English. The Agnus Dei was chanted in Latin. The six-man schola intoned a Marian Latin piece during Holy Communion. The children bowed their heads before receiving Communion, and knelt (as did the entire assembly) upon returning to their pews. O Santissima, accompanied by strings, was heavenly!

Parishes of the Diocese of Phoenix – take note!

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2 Responses to “O Santissima”

  1. Anonymous said

    just a small note on your use of “Santissima.” In latin it is “SANCTISSIMA.” Perhaps it was just a typo?

  2. rev fr lw gonzales said

    I used to singing it in Spanish. Sorry for the mix up. Thanks for your comment.

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